come and take it

texas 1835

 

Between 1821 and 1834, tens of thousands of Americans and Europeans came to Texas at the behest of the Mexican government. They came from all manner of states and countries, loosely bound together only by necessity and a taste for opportunity and freedom. Promised land and limited autonomy in exchange for for acceptance of Mexican rule and the Catholic religion, it wasn’t long until the settlers were ready to fight with the newly independent Mexican government over all kinds of issues from religion and land to laws and courts. Delegates will be thrown into the mix as the fight for freedom begins, with the danger of overwhelming force bearing down on them from Mexico, severe internal divisions, and poor relations with nearby Native Americans set against them as they battle their way towards independence and attempt to build a unified Texas. Every second will count in the hectic frontier that is Texas, but the rugged individualists that forged a trail to get there are ready to defend it with everything they have.


richard oyeniran

Chair

Richard Oyeniran is a third year majoring in Economics as he is too far in to go back. He hails from the town of Sugar Land in, surprise, the great state of Texas (Yes, his town is actually called Sugar Land. P.S. He loves when you ask about it.). Richard has one major life goal. He wants to see Texas become an independent nation. Since that will likely never happen, he’s thrilled for the second best option: running a committee reliving Texas’ glory days as an independent nation.  

james barriere

Crisis Director

James Barriere is a third year in the College majoring in Economics and Public Policy. He hails from Albany, New York, which you may recognize from that time you tried to memorize all of the state capitals in elementary school. Why did you do that? When not engaged in a heated and weirdly-emotional argument over what exactly constitutes “Upstate New York,” he can be found talking competitively on Chicago’s traveling Model UN team; writing for our campus food publication, Bite; or struggling to rectify his inability to do math with his quantitative major. He also loves writing personal bios in the third person.

ChoMUN XX is James’ second turn as a Crisis Director, after overseeing rigged elections, separatist eco-terrorists, and dirty bombs last year on Goodluck Out of Luck: Nigeria 2014. He has also served as an AC at ChoMUN XVIII, on the Massachusetts Bay Colony, and MUNUC XXVIII, on UN Water. This will be another great ChoMUN, and he is excited to see what the committee has in store for Texas.

Texas- Paul.jpg

paul soltys

CRISIS DIRECTOR

Paul Soltys is a first year majoring in Public Policy and minoring in Statistics, who hails from the great state of New Jersey (Central NJ. Not north, not south). Outside of Model UN, he writes for the Gate, a political magazine on campus and teaches with Peer Health Exchange in local high schools. A lover of oddball politics and better yet oddball military campaigns, he is excited to see what glorious victories and defeats will arise, whether they are political, military, or just moral, in the formation of Texas.

 


USG: Fernando De Stefanis

fds.usg@chomun.org